Stop trusting your code

Secure your Node.js apps from bugs, exploits and malicious code

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A smarter way to secure your Node.js apps

Unlike most runtime security solutions, which try to defend against application-level attacks via analysis or monitoring, Intrinsic provides a direct enforcement mechanism to ensure that all code strictly abides by your specified security policies.

The process is simple. You write specifically-formatted security policies that are stored in a centralized location, separate from the application code. Intrinsic then automatically enforces these policies using a new, application-level runtime virtualization technology.

Reduce

Reduce the attack surface by least-privileging your application routes and whitelisting the end-points your routes can talk to.

Prevent

Centralized security policies drastically reduce the impact of buggy or malicious code and let you protect against what you don’t know.

Deploy

Intrinsic is just a library and is fully compatible with legacy code. There's no need to modify how you currently deploy and write your code.

Our team

Intrinsic is built on the shoulders of years of academic research in the fields of security and systems lead by parts of its team at Stanford University. Some of our previous work includes DARPA-, DoD-, and Google-funded research and projects like bcrypt, Kademlia, tcpcrypt, Hails and COWL.

We're hiring

We are currently hiring engineers that have experience or interest in building secure systems. Candidates should have a strong background in one (or more) of the following: systems (e.g., language runtimes, operating systems, browser engines); programming languages (e.g., compilers, type systems, static analysis); security (e.g., building security monitors or tools). Exposure to a subset of relevant technologies (Node.js/V8, C/C++, LXC/sVirt, Rust, Haskell, and JavaScript) is desirable, but not required.

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Investors

Intrinsic is backed by leading investment firms NEA, Andreessen Horowitz, First Round Capital and Stanford University's StartX fund.